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<i>Aatma</i>

 
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By: Taran Adarsh, IndiaFM
Friday, May 26, 2006
Still from AatmaAfter reviving the trend of horror films in India and making a career by scaring the daylights of viewers in films like Do Gaz Zameen Ke Neeche, Darwaza, Guest House, Hotel, Sannata, Purana Mandir, Saamri and Veerana, the Ramsays are back with Aatma, directed by Deepak Ramsay.

To be honest, Aatma is old wine presented in a new bottle. The content is similar to what the Ramsays offered in the 1970s, 1980s and early 1990s. The scary eyes, the screams, the lightning... nothing has changed. But the audiences have changed, haven't they?

At a time when horror films have gone beyond skulls and skeletons, Deepak Ramsay should've ensured that the film is very much with the times. Sad, he didn't!

Aatma tells the story of a doctor, Aman [Kapil Jhaveri] and his wife Neha [Neha]. Aman has to perform postmortem of a man who has been killed by his treacherous brother Mukesh Tiwari, his lawyer Sadashiv Amrapurkar and other accomplices.

They deceitful gang kidnap Neha and force Aman to prepare a false postmortem report, stating that he had a natural death. The ghost of the deceased person decides to punish Aman and enters Neha's body to seek revenge.

Aatma has nothing new to offer. Armed with a flimsy plot, the film tries everything in the book to scare the viewer, but in vain. The problem, as stated above, is lack of novelty. Deepak Ramsay's direction is handicapped by an outdated script. Music is also a letdown.

Neha is the lone performer who stands out. She is effective in the sequence when the ghost enters her body. Kapil Jhaveri is strictly okay. He needs to loosen up. Vikram Singh hams. Amreina only adds to the glamour quotient. Mukesh Tiwari is wasted. Sadashiv Amrapurkar, Deep Dhillon, Usha Bachani, Yateen Karyekar and Sikander Kharbanda are passable.

On the whole, Aatma is a dull fare.

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